Law Podcasts: 5 Great Access to Justice Podcasts

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We’re reaching a golden age for podcasts: Podcasting is one of the fastest-growing mediums for content worldwide with new podcasts being introduced all the time. For fans of law podcasts, that means there have never been more options, including when it comes to access to justice podcasts. For legal professionals, access to justice podcasts can be a great way to consume new information about changing human rights law, seek inspiration, and learn from the best practices of other lawyers or people operating to increase access to justice in the legal industry. 

With so many choices for law podcasts, we decided to round up five law podcasts that either focus exclusively on access to justice or have strong access to justice episodes. For each recommendation, we’ll include: 

  • Recommend episode(s) to start with
  • Episode length
  • Episode frequency
  • What the podcast is about and what makes it unique
  • Where to listen

Family Matters by SKB Law

What the podcast is about

For more than two decades, family law and divorce lawyer Sarah Khan-Bashir, MBE and founder of SKB Law, has been assisting families and individuals in divorce matters, with a particular focus on the British Asian community. 

In this podcast series, Sarah examines the issues, taboos, and realities of divorce in the South Asian community in a pragmatic, caring, and heartfelt way.  

The podcast is released monthly to bimonthly and each episodes runs for 30 to 40 minutes. 

What makes this podcast unique

While there are some great podcasts out there that take a broad look at the reality of divorce (including the highly recommended The Divorce Podcast from Kate Daly of Amicable.io), Family Matters by SKB Law delves deep into the experience of the South Asian community in the UK, and the cultural and practical implications and consideration of divorce therein. 

Start with this episode

In the powerful episode Child Bride to City Champion: In Conversation with Inayah Sher, Sarah speaks to Inayah Sher, who was married at five years old and sent to Pakistan at fourteen years old before taking the decision to leave her husband at thirty-six years old. 

Inayah shares her journey post-divorce with Sarah, including returning to education, starting a business, becoming a grandmother, and her work to start community group Bradford4Better

*Please note: This episode includes discussion of forced marriage, child marriage, domestic abuse, and suicide.

Where to subscribe

Listen to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or on SKB Law’s website.

 

Legally Speaking Podcast

What the podcast is about

When it comes to law podcasts, few are faster growing in listenership than the Legally Speaking Podcast. As a legal recruitment expert, Legally Speaking host Robert Hanna has a passion for improving and engaging on the issues facing the legal sector. In The Legally Speaking Podcast, he speaks to a wide range of experts and individuals, from the UK, the U.S., and worldwide, to discuss a variety of topics, including diversity and inclusion, mental health in the legal space, career advice, marketing, and legal tech.

Podcasts are released weekly and are roughly 30 to 40 minutes long. 

What makes this podcast unique

Although this weekly podcast is not dedicated solely to access to justice, Robert Hanna has a keen interest in the practice of law and the access to justice space. As such, his guests often include leaders and changemakers in the legal profession who are changing the practice of law for the better. 

Start with these episodes

In How to Be an Award-Winning Lawyer in the Legal Industry, Robert speaks to Chidi Onyeche, the winner of the Under-35 Lawyer of the Year at the 2021 Inspirational Women in Law Awards. In addition to being an associate at Latham & Watkins working in the Project Development and Finance Practice and a member of the firm’s Africa Practice, Chidi is also a non-executive director of The Making of Black Britain project, and the co-founder of an online platform called the Ultimate Guide Group which focuses on providing information to the black community on careers, finances, property investing and wellness.

She discusses mentorship, equity, and the opportunities and challenges facing the black community in the legal sector in the episode here

In How Can We Make Family Law More Accessible, family lawyer Emma Nash, Family Law Partner at Fletcher Day, discusses the need for reform within the family justice system. As part of her advocacy to make family law easier to understand and more accessible to everyone, she founded the Family Law Language Project. She discusses that project and other areas of family law in the UK in this episode

Where to subscribe

Listen to the podcast on any platform that supports podcasts, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Google Podcasts, or on www.legallyspeakingpodcast.com.

 

The Rights Track

What the podcast is about

Hosted by Todd Landman, author, Professor of Political Science and Pro Vice Chancellor of the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Nottingham, The Rights Track podcast takes an in-depth look at disparate human rights issues, including human rights advocacy, modern-day slavery, sustainability, and human rights during COVID-19. 

Episodes are run in seasons with a typical monthly release date. Each episode is between 30 to 60 minutes long. 

What makes this podcast unique

Each season of The Rights Track podcast deals with distinct area of human rights. In season 7, the latest season in the podcast series, The Rights Track looks at human rights in the digital age. Professor Landman is joined by a range of academics and advocates to examine whether technological innovation is advancing or stifling human rights in the modern day. 

Start with this episode

In the inaugural episode of season 7, Human rights in a digital world: the pitfalls and positives,  Managing Director of the University of Nottingham’s Data-Driven Discovery Initiative (3DI) Ben Lucas speaks to Todd about both the opportunities digital innovation presents and the threats to human rights. The episode gives a nuanced overview of the issue, with discussion on Disinformation and Propaganda, how social media can influence collective action, food waste innovation, and more besides. 

You can listen to the episode here.

Where to subscribe

The Rights Track podcast is available across all popular platforms, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, and Deezer. You can also see all platforms and podcasts on www.rightstrack.org

 

Daily Matters

What the podcast is about

Set up during COVID-19, this Clio podcast, hosted by Clio CEO and Co-founder Jack Newton, examines new ways of working for lawyers, how legal professionals and law firms can succeed in an increasingly tech-forward world, and the issues, challenges, and opportunities that face the legal industry globally.

Podcasts are released daily during seasons and are between 30 to 60 minutes long. 

What makes this podcast unique

In the more than 100 episodes of the Daily Matters podcast, Jack Newton speaks to some of the most influential, inspirational, and innovative individuals working in both the legal industry and surrounding industries. Interviewees include some of the most well-known names in the areas human rights law and social change advocacy. Previous guests include I. Stephanie Boyce, the sixth woman, the first black officeholder, and the first person of colour elected to the presidency of the Law Society of England and Wales; co-founder and executive director of non-profit Pro Bono Net, Mark O’Brien; and civil rights lawyer, teacher, writer, and activist Dan Canon.

Start with this episode

In Episode 101 of the Daily Matters podcast, Jack speaks to globally renowned civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump, founder and principal at Ben Crump Law. As the attorney to the families of Trayvon Martin, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Jacob Blake, and many others who have died during interactions with police, Ben Crump has become a central figure in America’s reinvigorated struggle for civil rights and justice reform. 

He discusses his major influences, how and why he began to represent victims of police violence, and Ben’s take on the modern Civil Rights Movement. You can listen to the episode here

Where to subscribe

Listen to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, and Stitcher, or on the Clio website.

 

Transitional Justice Institute: Public Lectures and Events

What the podcast is about

Offered by Ulster University’s Transitional Justice Institute (TJI), the TJI podcast shares recordings of lectures and events hosted by the TJI. The resultant podcast spans a wide area of human rights, from gender, international law, conflict and peace, encompassing both a domestic and international view of topics. 

There is no set schedule or length for any podcast, but most are at least an hour long.

What makes this podcast unique

Unlike some of the other podcasts on this list, the Transitional Justice Institute’s podcast is not an in-studio interview but a series of public lectures and events. As such, topics are usually delivered by a different scholar or practitioner in a seminar format, making for a rich educational experience. 

Start with these episodes

The four-session series CEDAW and Sexual Orientation and Gender Identify includes four panel discussions that examine the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and the current and potential future activities of the CEDAW Committee. Each session looks at a different women’s issues, gender identity and sexual orientation and health and education. 

Where to subscribe

The Transitional Justice Institute: Public Lectures and Events podcast is available on Spotify and Apple Podcasts

Categorized in: Access to Justice, Business, Professional Development